How your net worth changes

Okay, let's get started. First we need to calculate a baseline scenario using your current financial situation. Don't worry, we're not logging, saving, or transmitting this information.

How much money are you making now per year?

$50000

Do you get an annual raise? How much has it typically been? If not, enter zero for no raise.

3 %

How much are you spending on housing, food, entertainment, travel, etc. per month?

$4000

This is a projection of your net worth assuming you don’t go to school.

Great, now we need some info about how much school is going to cost.

How many years will you spend in school?

2  years

How much is tuition per year?

$40000

How much will you be spending on housing, food, entertainment, travel, etc. per month?

$1000

How much will you be borrowing to attend school?

$50000

What is the interest rate of your loan?

5.0 %

By the time you finish school, you will have saved than if you stayed in the workforce, and you will have accrued debt during school. This means your net worth at graduation would be than if you stayed working.

Now for the payoff. Lets figure out what you expect your life to be like once you have that new degree.

How long will it take you to payback the loan, including the time you'll spend in school?

10  years

What do you expect to be making after you have your degree?

$100000

What do you expect to be spending on housing, food, entertainment, travel, etc. per month? This is on top of your $ monthly loan payment.

$6000

How large do you expect your annual raises to be in the future?

4 %

Considering all of these factors, it will take you  to see a financial return on your investment of going to grad school.

To fine tune your projection, you can adjust the factors below.

How quickly do you expect your expenses to rise in price, annually?

3 %

How much money do you expect to make by investing unspent cash, annually?

5 %

How much will you be paid or granted while enrolled, either during the school year or during breaks, per year?

$0